The Federal Trade Commission issued a decision, In re Amway Corp., in 1979 in which it indicated that multi-level marketing was not illegal per se in the United States. However, Amway was found guilty of price fixing (by effectively requiring "independent" distributors to sell at the same fixed price) and making exaggerated income claims.[47][48] The FTC advises that multi-level marketing organizations with greater incentives for recruitment than product sales are to be viewed skeptically. The FTC also warns that the practice of getting commissions from recruiting new members is outlawed in most states as "pyramiding".[49]

First: Invite people to look at your business proposition with a direct or indirect approach.  A direct approach would be to ask them to look at your business for themselves. An indirect approach is asking someone to look at your business to assist you with recommendations or referrals.  There are many different patterns of language that you can use based on the relationship you have with the prospective recruit.  The invitation process is a very important skill to learn. Your invitation has a lot to do with whether the person will join your team or support your business.
I really appreciate the truths and the facts as well John..#2 and #8 is very very important in network marketing.The word “TIME IS MONEY” Is so bad when you working for someone as your boss, because you devote your time and you working for your boss to earn from you. After you spending a whole of your time working for him to earn big, all he can do for you for so many years is to give you something small just to keep you… John i love this..
Mentor your recruits effectively. If recruits are successful, you make more money, so you should be prepared to train them well. This may be a substantial time commitment, even up to several weeks. But you should understand that you're building a team and it is in your best interest to spend enough time making sure your recruits are competent enough to go off on their own.[8][9] 

Disclaimer: The information contained in this document is provided for informational purposes only and should not be construed as financial or tax advice. It is not intended to be a substitute for obtaining accounting or other financial advice from an appropriate financial adviser or for the purpose of avoiding U.S. Federal, state or local tax payments and penalties.
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